Texas considers nixing BC, AD in school books for non-Christian dates

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The Texas State Board of Education is considering dropping the uses of BC and AD in textbooks and replacing them with a non-religious dating system in a proposal for a new statewide social studies curriculum.

The change, which would remove Christian references for dates, is in a draft for social studies classes and was noticed by a Texas teacher who spoke out against the proposal at the latest board of education meeting.

“I see that BC and AD were taken out and BCE and CE were added in instead,” social studies teacher Andrew Pearce said. “I believe this is an effort to take out anything the least bit Christian from our public sphere.”

Andrew Pearce.
“Getting rid of BC and AD is basically saying that Jesus is offensive,” Andrew Pearce argued.
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BCE dates.
The new curriculum would use BCE, or “before the common era,” and CE, or “common era.”
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Texas school board meeting.
The Texas State Board of Education argued that the change has “everything to do with accuracy when dealing with historical events.”
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Instead of using BC (“before Christ”) and AD (“anno domini,” Latin for “in the year of the Lord”), the new curriculum would use BCE, or “before the common era,” and CE, or “common era.”

“Getting rid of BC and AD is basically saying that Jesus is offensive, not inclusive and not relevant, however, Jesus is not only mentioned in the Bible, but also, the Quran mentions him over 25 times and he’s an important prophet to Muslims,” added Pearce, who urged the state board to continue to use that widely accepted dating system.

The board, however, argued that the change had nothing to do with religion.

“It has nothing to do with removing Christ from the calendar and everything to do with accuracy when dealing with historical events and including people of all faiths with discussion of history,” responded board member Rebecca Bell-Metereau.

She added that the use of BCE and CE is for the sake of historical accuracy because Jesus was not actually born in 1 AD, and the dating system was invented around 500 years after his birth.

The state board of education told The Post that the non-religious dating system is far from making it into a final adoption and there will a “more nuanced” revision process discussed in the fall. No date has been set yet for that discussion.

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